Drug Resistant Sea Lice

If you are wondering why I am sharing this video about sea lice off the coast of BC’s Vancouver Island it is because sea lice are believed to harm wild salmon stocks. Furthermore affecting the black and grizzly bear diet ultimately starving and potentially killing the bears. Fish farms use a drug called "slice" to control sea lice but in this case the sea lice became drug resistant and the area was overwhelmed by sea lice. This is why I am ultimately against farming salmon, although I realize our hunger for the omega 3 rich protien salmon is not sustainable thus our consumption or conservation efforts need to be examined.

 

Alex Follows a Trail of Lice from Twyla Roscovich on Vimeo.

Scope Height

Intereting article on scope height and scope size. It makes a lot of sense, the higher your scope, the more variables for error. Canting your scope left or right is also a greater possibility when your scope is mounted with high rings or you have a large objective lense that requires higher mounting. Read a detailed article describing this phenomenom.

 

SCOPE HEIGHT
 by John Barsness

John Barsness EVER SINCE THE 1960’s, when the original Redfield company started selling the first "practical" variable-magnification telescopic sights in the U.S., riflescopes have been getting bigger.  These days it’s not uncommon to see scopes topping out at 20x or more on deer rifles.  These "Hubbles" violate one of the old rules of scope mounting, still obsessed over by some hunters: Hunting scopes should be mounted as low as possible over the bore.

This is an interesting conflict, since it brings up all sorts of side-effects.

First, let’s look at the old notion that scopes should be mounted really low.  This arose back in the days when most hunting rifles were designed for iron sights, with a relatively low-angling buttstock allowing the shooter’s eye to line up with the sights.

Also, in the early days of scopes, many had relatively small fields of view.  This may seem odd, since most early hunting scopes were low-power, but they also had thin tubes of 7/8" or even ¾", and very small ocular lenses.  So it helped to mount the scopes as close as possible to the same height as iron sights, since this helped the shooter "find" the small field of view.

Low mounting also had another benefit.  Early scopes weren’t all that strong, thanks in part to the thin tubes.  Scopes close to the rifle’s action weren’t as likely to be banged around and knocked out of alignment, and lower mounts tended to be stronger than higher mounts.

Back then most higher mounts were designed to allow the shooter an instant choice between iron sights and scope.  Scopes were delicate, and also tended to fog, because they weren’t sealed against atmospheric moisture.  But high mounts, whether inexpensive Holden Ironsighters or expensive Griffin & Howe side-mounts, allowed scopes to be knocked out of alignment more easily.

If you don’t believe this, find a rifle with either of those high mounts, put a collimator in the muzzle, and look through the scope while pressing on the tube from various directions.  The scope’s reticle will wobble around amazingly, and may not even return to its original spot.  If mere hand-pressure can do that, imagine what a real "hunting bump" might do.  That’s another reason many experienced hunters preferred low-mounted scopes.

These days both scopes and mounts are tougher, and some (but not all) rifle stocks are designed to put our eye in line with a scope.  With many rifles and scopes, low mounts can’t be used, because the objective bell of the scope won’t allow it.  Modern scopes and stocks enable most hunters to instantly find a full field-of-view with their scope mounted in medium-height rings.

So there’s no real reason to mount scopes as low as possible over the bore.  Or is there?  One problem that can occur as scopes get mounted higher is the effect of "canting" is increased.  Canting is aiming the rifle slightly tilted to one side or the other.  Exactly how this causes problems takes some explaining.

Let’s say we sight-in a typical .30-06 so 180-grain bullets are landing in a group 2" directly above the point of aim at 100 yards.  When doing this, we’re essentially manipulating a long, narrow X.  One leg of the X is the line-of-sight of the scope’s reticle, and the other is the bullet’s flight.  The bullet starts out below the scope, but at 100 yards is above the scope, so somewhere between the muzzle and 100 yards, the two legs of the X cross.

The line-of-sight is straight, but the bullet’s flight is slightly curved, because gravity starts pulling the bullet downward as soon as it leaves the muzzle.  At 200 yards the bullet’s curve intersects straight line-of-sight of the reticle.  Beyond 200 the bullet falls increasingly below the reticle line-of-sight.

Now, visualize aiming the same rifle as it lies on its left side.  The pull of gravity has changed 90 degrees.  The bullet still travels in the same curve, but the curve no longer aligns vertically with the reticle.  Instead it curves below the reticle’s line of sight.  The line-of-sight of the scope will still be straight, but instead of the bullet landing 2" above the reticle, it will land to the left of the reticle–and it will land a lot further than 2" left, and low.

To a smaller extent, this is exactly what happens we cant the rifle just a little.  A bit of cant doesn’t cause enough change in point-of-impact out to 100 yards to make any significant difference on a deer or elk, but it can at longer ranges.  And the effect of cant grows greater with the height of the scope above the bore.

Most of us can keep a rifle fairly level when shooting, but some, uh, can’t.  The first time I encountered this was many years ago, when a local friend named Jim bought a new rifle and scope.  He’d started making enough money to afford to go on guided hunts for various North American animals, and also decided he needed some lighter, more powerful rifle than the Ruger 77 .257 Roberts he’d been shooting for 30-some years.  One was going to be a real mountain rifle for hunting Dall and Stone sheep.

So he bought a Weatherby Ultra Lightweight 7mm-08, and also decided he needed a more powerful scope than the old 3-9x Redfield on his .257.  He bought a 4-16x with a 50mm adjustable objective.  With this new high-tech rifle and scope, he fully expected to shoot groups even smaller than with his old .257.  Instead the 7mm-08’s groups averaged 2-3", no matter what handloading combinations he tried.

Finally he asked me to help, so I took the 7mm-08 went to the range one day with Jim’s handloads, and some of mine.  I shot a number of groups of 1" or less, so invited Jim to come along during the next range session.  He sat down and proceeded to shoot a 2-1/2" group.  We let the barrel cool, then he shot some more at the same target.  Some bullets landed right where they should, but others landed to the right or left, and usually a little lower.

Now, I had seen Jim consistently shoot sub-inch groups with his .257, so his shooting ability wasn’t the problem.  But the big scope was sitting way up there.  I suggested he get a smaller scope and mount it lower.  He had just been converted to the notion of a "Hubble" by a salesman in the local gun store, but agreed pretty readily to my suggestion, as he’d never really felt comfortable with the big scope.  He traded the 4-16x back to the same store for a 3-9x and some medium rings.  The right and left fliers went away, and Jim went on the kill two expensive wild sheep with the little rifle, along with a mountain caribou.

Some shooters apparently don’t have much sense of "level" when shooting, even on a level range, and Jim was one.  This is the reason that many (if not most) long-range target shooters, and even some varmint shooters, often employ a scope level.

On the other hand, higher mounts do apparently flatten the trajectory of any rifle somewhat.  Remember the two legs of the X of the scope reticle and the bullet?  If we use higher scope mounts, the distance between the scope and muzzle becomes greater, so the bullet’s path angles slightly higher beyond 100 yards.

Let’s compare the trajectories of the same .30-06 and 180-grain load, sighted-in 2" high at 100 yards, with two different scope heights, using Sierra’s Infinity program.

First let’s calculate the trajectory with the scope 1.5" over the bore, an average height these days:

100 yards: +2"
200 yards: -0-
300 yards: -8
400 yards: -23.5
500 yards: -47


Now let’s see what the same load does with the scope 2" over the bore:

100 yards: +2"
200 yards: +.5
300 yards: -7
400 yards: -22
500 yards: -45


Now, the trajectory really isn’t flatter, it’s just been manipulated by scope height.  Is an inch at 300 yards or two inches at 500 enough gain to make the higher mounts worthwhile, especially since they increase the effects of cant?

Of course, these days real long-range shooters tend to click the elevation turret, so a slightly flatter trajectory makes even less difference.  But clicking doesn’t change the effects of canting.  So in at least one way it still makes sense to mount the scope as low as possible over the bore-even if the scopes we use these days can’t go as low as the Lyman Alaskan on grandpa’s Savage 99.

__________________________________________________

original article here: http://www.24hourcampfire.com/newsletters/February_2011.html

Field Care Ebook

Just in time for spring bear hunting comes a free bear field care ebook available by download @ Hunting Tips and Tricks.

The book contains pictures and step by step instruction on how to properly care for your game in the field after harvesting it. Gutting, skinning, and preservation for a rug are all discussed in detail with exceptional photography.

Optics Demo Sale

I just got these deals emailed to me, check them out. Great deals on optics:

Camera Land’s
Post SHOT Show & SCI Demo & Close Out List

I am doing my best to inventory the show sample/demo goods that are arriving. It is a bit overwhelming trying to get everything done, however, I am trying.
Today I have updated the original demo list. This list contains demos as well as discontinued new inventory at VERY REDUCED prices.

As all of these items are limited quantities we have not posted all of them on our web site so please feel free to call Doug or Neil @ 212-753-5128 to place an order, or just to ask a question.
As we get more goods in I will add to this thread.

Swarovski:

All of these riflescopes are in as new condition and come complete same as a new one, in their original box/packaging.

#59917 Z6 5-30×50 BR Riflescope only $1649.99 This scope has slight ring marks. This scope is normally $2369.00. It is on Anniversary Sale promotion right now @ $2139.00.

#59417 Z6 2.5-15×44 BR Riflescope only $1499.99 This scope has slight ring marks. This scope is normally $2199.00. It is on Anniversary Sale promotion right now @ $1979.00.

#59212 Z6 1.7-10×42 4 Riflescope only $1349.99 This scope is normally $1899.00. It is on Anniversary Sale promotion right now @ $1699.00.

#59617 Z6 3-18×50 BR Riflescope only $1599.99 This scope is normally $2299.00. It is on Anniversary Sale promotion right now @ $2069.00.

Laser Guide 8×30 with Holster only $789.99, normally $999.00

Swarovski Crystal Series Tosca 8×20 Pocket Binocular only $449.99 reduced from $899.00

Swarovski Crystal Series Idomenco 8×20 Pocket Binocular only $449.99 reduced from $899.00

In New Goods we have the following deals:
8×30 SLC Binocular only $849.99 reduced from $1149.00

Zeiss:

Conquest 3-9x40mm Riflescope:
Z-Plex #20 Reticle – $369.99, reduced from $399.99
#4 Reticle – $449.99, reduced from $499.99
Rapid Z-600 #71 Reticle – $469.99, reduced from $574.99

Conquest 3.5-10x44mm Riflescope:
#4 Reticle – $589.99, reduced from $699.99
#20 Z-Plex Reticle – $589.99, reduced from $699.99
#71 Rapid Z-600 Reticle $629.99, reduced from $774.99
#72 Rapid Z-800 Reticle – $629.99, reduced from $774.99

Conquest 3.5-10x50mm Riflescope:
#20 Z-Plex Reticle – $629.99, reduced from $749.99
#71 Rapid Z-600 Reticle $649.99, reduced from $824.99
#72 Rapid Z-800 Reticle – $649.99, reduced from $824.99

Conquest 3-12×56 (30mm tube) #8 Reticle only $789.99 reduced from $999.99

Conquest 4.5-14×44 Riflescope:
#72 Rapid Z-800 Reticle – $699.99, reduced from $874.99
#73 Rapid Z-1000 Reticle – $699.99, reduced from $874.99
#43 Mildot Reticle, Target Turret- $749.99, reduced from $949.99

Conquest 4.5-14x50mm Riflescope:
#72 Rapid Z-800 Reticle – $769.99, reduced from $924.99
#73 Rapid Z-1000 Reticle – $769.99, reduced from $924.99
#43 Mildot Reticle, Target Turret- $749.99, reduced from $949.99

Conquest 6.5-20x50mm Target Turret Riflescope:
#20 Z-Plex – $759.99, reduced from $999.99
#4 – $759.99, reduced from $999.99
#43 Mildot – $799.99, reduced from $1049.99
#73 Rapid Z-1000 – $869.99, reduced from $1074.99
#75 Rapid Z-Varmint – $869.99, reduced from $1074.99

#521777-9920 Diavari 4-16×50 T* FL Riflescope 2nd IP 30mm tube, with #20 Z-Plex Reticle, Hunting ASV only $1999.99, reduced from $2499.99

#521777-9972 Diavari 4-16×50 T* FL Riflescope 2nd IP 30mm tube, with #72 Rapid Z-800 Reticle, Hunting ASV only $1899.99, reduced from $2399.99

Victory 8×56 FL T* Lotutec Binocular only $1499.99, reduced from $2249.99

Conquest 8×30 T* Binocular only $529.99, reduced from $649.99

Conquest 8×40 T* Binocular only $799.99, reduced from $949.99

Conquest 8×50 T* Binocular only $899.99, reduced from $1349.99

Conquest 8×56 T* Binocular only $1099.99, reduced from $1449.99

Victory 8×45 T* RF Rangefinder Binocular only $2399.99, reduced from $2899.99

Victory 10×45 T* RF Rangefinder Binocular only $2449.99, reduced from $2999.99

Victory 8×56 T* RF Rangefinder Binocular only $2799.99, reduced from $3299.99

Victory PRF 8×26 T* Lotutec Rangefinder only $599.99, reduced from $699.99

Minox:

DCM 5.0 – Digital camera, monitor and eyepiece all in one only $99.99. This is a digital camera eyepiece for your spotting scope. We have these available for the following Spotting Scopes:
Minox
Leica
Zeiss
All you do is take the eyepiece off of your scope and replace it with this eyepiece camera and you are ready to take pictures. Awesome and easy.

#62029 BV II 10×42 BR Binocular @ $179.99

#62122 BD 8×32 BR Binocular @ $179.99

#62167 BV 8×42 BR @ $109.99

#62169 BD 8.5×42 BR @ $299.99

#62170 BD 10×42 BR @ $329.99

#62197 BL 8×33 Comfort Bridge Binocular @ $249.99

#62171 BV 8×25 BRW Binocular @ $79.99

#62172 BV 10×25 BRW Binocular @ $79.99

#62175 APO-HG 8.5×43 Binocular @ $799.99

#62194 APO-HG 10×43 Binocular – German @ $999.99

#62226 MD-50 Straight Spotting Scope @ $169.99

#62225 MD-50 Angled Spotting Scope @ $169.99

#62166 BL 13×56 BR Big Eye Binocular @ $499.99

#62036 BL 15×56 BR Big Eye Binocular @ $579.99

#62151 BD 10×44 BP Porro Prism Binocular @ $179.99

#62149 BL 8×32 BR Binocular @ $249.99

#62163 HG 8×33 BR Yards @ $369.99

#62148 BL 10×42 BR Binocular @ $249.99

#62113 BD 8×24 BR Binocular with Altimeter @ $119.99 or #62115 without Altimeter $99.99

#62114 BD 10×25 BR Binocular with Altimeter @ 119.99 or #62116 without Altimeter $99.99

#62023 BD 10×20 CP Binocular @ $69.99

Minox Open Box Riflescope Deal – These have not been mounted and come with the full warranty

#66000 ZA-3 3-9x40mm Plex only $289.99 reduced from $399.00

#66001 ZA-3 3-9x40mm BDC only $299.99 reduced from $419.00

#66010 ZA-5 2-10x40mm Plex only $349.99 reduced from $479.00

#66030 ZA-5 4-20x50mm Plex only $549.99 reduced from $699.00

ZA-5 1.5-8x32mm only $399.99, reduced from $479.00 in your choice of Mino-Plex, Versa-Plex & Ger #4 Reticles

#62210 MD-62 Straight with Minox #62300 20-45x Zoom Eyepiece only $399.99, reduced from $848.00. Add a DCM 5.0 – Digital camera, monitor and eyepiece all in one at time of purchase for only $79.99

#62211 MD-62 Angled with Minox #62300 20-45x Zoom Eyepiece only $399.99, reduced from $898.00. Add a DCM 5.0 – Digital camera, monitor and eyepiece all in one at time of purchase for only $79.99

#62188 – Minox German HG 8×33 BR only $629.99, reduced from $1295.00

#62189 – Minox German HG 8×43 BR only $649.99, reduced from $1345.00

#62190 – Minox German HG 10×43 BR only $679.99, reduced from $1395.00

#62192 – Minox German HG 10×52 BR only $749.99, reduced from $1595.00

#62193 – Minox German APO-HG 8×43 BR only $1099.99, reduced from $1849.99

Leica:

#40037 Geovid 8×42 HD-Yards only $1849.99 originally $2349.00

#40528 CRF 1600 Rangemaster only $699.99, originally $799.00

#40297 12×50 Ultravid HD Armored only $1899.99, originally $2399.99

#40293 8×42 Ultravid HD Armored only $1699.99, originally $2099.00

#40290 8×32 Ultravid HD Armored only $1499.99, originally $1899.00

#40263 8×20 BCL w/Brown Leather Case only $639.99, originally $799.00

#40342 8X20 BCA w/Case only $369.99, originally $469.00

#40343 10X25 BCA w/Case only $399.99, originally $499.00

#40390 8×20 Monovid w/Case only $399.99, originally $499.00

ER 2.5-10×42 Riflescope in your choice of Plex, 4A, #1 or CDD Reticle for $1449.99 and we will give you $400.00 for any working riflescope on a trade bringing the cost down to only $1049.99

ER 2.5-10×42 Riflescope in your the BR Reticle for $1499.99 and we will give you $400.00 for any working riflescope on a trade bringing the cost down to only $1099.99

ER 3.5-14×42 Plex Riflescope in your choice of Plex, 4A, #1 or CDD Reticle for $1549.99 and we will give you $400.00 for any working riflescope on a trade bringing the cost down to only $1149.99

Vortex:

These are new units that are being closed out by Vortex to make room in their line for 2011 models. This is a wonderful opportunity to get a great Vortex Optic at a very reduced price.

Vortex Razor 8.5×50 Binocular only $479.99 reduced from $829.99 – Only a couple of these are left

Vortex Viper 6×32 Binocular only $329.99 reduced from $509.99

Vortex Viper 8×32 Binocular only $339.99 reduced from $519.99

Vortex Viper 10×32 Binocular only $339.99 reduced from $529.99

Vortex Viper 8×42 Binocular only $349.99 reduced from $539.99

Vortex Viper 10×42 Binocular only $349.99 reduced from %549.99

Vortex Viper 12×42 Binocular only $349.99 reduced from $559.99

Vortex Viper 8.5×50 Binocular only $374.99 reduced from $589.99

Vortex Viper 10×50 Binocular only $389.99 reduced from $599.99

Vortex Viper 15×50 Binocular only $399.99 reduced from $619.99

Vortex Fury 10x32mm Binocular for only $174.99, reduced from $279.99

Vortex Fury 8x32mm Binocular for only $174.99, reduced from $269.99

Vortex Fury 6.5x32mm Binocular for only $169.99, reduced from $259.99

Remember, with any Vortex Binocular purchase you can add their Vortex Binocular Harness Strap for only $10.00.

Vortex Viper 2-7x32mm riflescope for only $174.99, reduced from $259.99, in your choice of BDC, C3 or V-Plex reticle (Includes a set of Vortex rings) – Running low on the BDC Reticle

Vortex Viper 3.5-10x50mm riflescope with V-Plex reticle for only $249.99, reduced from $399.99 (Includes a set of Vortex rings)

Vortex Viper 3-9x40mm riflescope with V-Plex reticle for only $249.99, reduced from $299.99

Vortex Solo R/T 8×36 Tactical Monocular Part #RT836S only $79.99, reduced from $119.99

Vortex Impact RA 70mm Spotting Scope for only $179.99 – Only a couple of these are left

Vortex Skyline 20-60×80 Straight Spotting Scope only $299.99, reduced from $429.99.

Vortex Skyline 20-60×80 ED only $449.99 in your choice of Straight (orig. $799.00) or Angled (orig. $819.00).

You can also add on the Vortex MK 1 QR Digital Adapter to any Skyline Spotter purchase @ only $119.99, reduced from $149.99, for simple Digiscoping abilty.

We have another shipment arriving this week from Zeiss as well as one from Nikon. Please feel free to give a call with requests.

As always, all orders over $100.00 include Fed Ex ground shipping to a street address in the USA.

Thank you for your continued support.

Doug @ Camera Land
1-866-9optics
http://www.cameralandny.com