BC LEH now online

It is about time British Columbia got online with their Hunting Lottery system. Alberta has had their system online for years. I am happy about this as it will streamline the whole process as well as eliminate the rumour mill surrounding the BC LEH draw.

Hunter
 Registration
 and the
 Limited
 Entry
 Hunting
 (LEH)
Application
 Process 
Are
 Changing. The
 Province
 will 
introduce
 a
new
 online
 system
 for 
hunters
 in 
2016, 
making 
it 
easier
 for 
you 
to
register
 and
 apply 
for 
Limited 
Entry
 Hunting
 (LEH)
 permits.
 You
 can
submit
 LEH
 applications 
online
 at
 home 
or 
at 
a
 Service
BC,
FrontCounter
BC,
 or
 vendor 
location.
 The 
online 
service
 will 
be 
available 
for 
the 
Fall 
2016 
LEH
 Draw. 
More 
information 
will 
be
provided 
in 
the 
2016‐2017 
Limited 
Entry 
Hunting 
Regulations 
Synopsis. You
 can
 no 
longer 
purchase
paper 
application 
forms 
for 
the 
Fall 
2016 
LEH 
Draw
 or 
the 
2016 
Special 
Sheep
 LEH 
Draw. 
Forms 
for
 the
 Spring
 2016 
LEH
 Draw can
 be
 purchased
 only at
 the
following
 locations:

All
 Service 
BC
 locations 
during 
regular 
business 
hours; 
Monday
 to
Friday 
from 
8:30
a.m. 
to 
4:30
p.m. 
  I tried going to Wholesale sports in langley to purchase a LEH card but they were all out and told me to buy them from the Service BC locations.

Note:
You 
do 
not
 need
 a
 hunter
 number
 or 
license 
to purchase
 an
application
 form. If
 you
 have 
already 
purchased 
LEH
 application
forms,
 you
 can
 use
 them
 for
 the 
Spring
 2016
 or 
Fall
 2016
 Draw.
After 
that, 
paper 
application
 forms 
will 
NOT
 be 
accepted.

This bear was harvested using the BC LEH lottery

BCGrizzly

BCGrizzly

 

http://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/sports-culture/recreation/fishing-hunting/hunting/limited-entry-hunting/leh-online-applications

Dry Brine Smoked Salmon in 5 Easy Steps

Wild Smoked Salmon Fillet

The finished product.

I have tried multiple ways to smoke salmon and the dry brine method is my favorite. It is much simpler, cleaner, and quicker than keeping your fillets in a gooey tub overnight. Not to mention, the taste is far superior.

What you will need: 

  • A smoker, alder chips, and salmon fillets (obviously).
  • Dark brown sugar.
  • Non iodized salt. I like to use coarse canning salt.
  • Garlic cloves.
  • Mixing bowl
  • Tupperware type container for salmon fillets and brine.

1. Prepare the fillets

  • Make sure you are using wild fresh salmon. Best is Sockeye or Chinook, but any wild salmon will do.
  • You can cut them into 2-3″ wide strips or leave them whole if they are not too thick, and leave skin on.
  • Slice diagonal lines into the fillets to allow greater brine penetration.
Dry brine

Dry brine is ready for the garlic.

2. Prepare the brine.

  • The ratio is 4 cups of brown sugar, 1 cup of salt, 10 cloves of garlic.
  • If you need more brine, keep the ratio the same.
  • Mix in mixing bowl.
Fillets in Brine

Fillets in Brine

3. Brine the fillets.

  • Cover the fillets generously with the brine mix.
  • Stack in Tupperware starting with skin side down.
  • Stack flesh to flesh, and skin to skin.
  • Cover and let sit in fridge for approximately 6 hours.
  • The container will turn into a gooey mess

 

Dry brine turns gooey

Dry brine turns gooey

4. Rinse and Rack

  • Gently rinse coarse granules off fillets under the tap.
  • Spray racks with non stick cooking spray like Pam. This will make removal later much easier.
  • Place on rack.
  • Let dry with good circulation for 6 hours to develop sticky top layer.
Salmon ready for smoking

Salmon ready for smoking

Salmon in the big chief

Salmon in the big chief

5. Smoker time

  • Use smoker outdoors with nothing flammable in close proximity. Don’t use extension cord.
  • Pre- heat smoker for 15 mins.
  • Add alder chips and racks of salmon fillets.
  • You can add chips to determine strength of flavour. Usually more pans of fresh chips at the beginning.
  • Keep in smoker for around 6 hours. You can check earlier if you would like.

 

 

Bonus info

  1. The fillets always taste better the next day after cooling and sitting in the fridge.
  2. You can vacuum pack the smoked fillets to preserve them longer in the fridge.
  3. Some people use a blanket or a box over the smoker, but I never had good success with that method.
  4. I got this recipe from salmonuniversity.com

2011 Fraser Sockeye and Chinook Journal

2011 was a great year for fishing. I would have to say it was my favorite fishing year ever. On the majority of days you could expect to get 2 Sockeye salmon and 1 Chinook. This year I really got the feel for landing Chinook salmon on the river.

Chinook salmon

Chinook salmon

Chinook Salmon

A Spring in the sink

Fraser Chinook

Fraser Chinook

Chinook and Sockeye salmon

My Chinook with 2 Sockeye salmon alongside my friends Chinook salmon. This was a common day in 2011.

This little reel had a few draw backs. The major one is that it did not hold a lot of line, the other being it was light duty. The positive was I could cast this Diawa Exceler reel further than anyone in the river and get into the spring holes. I only got so much life out of it before it finally broke immediately after landing a Chinook salmon. I had to replace the line multiple times that year but it was worth it.

Broken reel

My Diawa Exceler reel breaks after reeling in a Spring salmon.

 

2015 BC LEH Results and Rumours

2015 BC LEH Results and Rumours

Every year there seems to be a set of different stories that run in the circles of BC resident hunters around Limited Entry Draw time. I have heard superstitious people swear by using blue ink, black in, red ink, felt pen etc. I have heard in years past that “anti’s” (Anti-Hunters) have been completing C.O.R.E, getting their hunter numbers, and buying LEH draws so they take chances away from legitimate hunters in the province. This year there was a believable rumour going around that postal workers who were not fond of hunters, would just throw out any LEH draw cards or envelopes addressed to Wildlife Branch on Jutland rd that would pass through their hands. This story made cautious LEH applicants send in their LEH cards in by registered mail or express post insuring no chance of being discarded.

Just in time for spring bear hunting season.

Imagine, having the convenience to bring up the field care chapter, or any other reference material from the entire Black Bear Hunting Encyclopedia book and DVD, while you are in the bush hunting with your mobile device?

Purchase: On iTunes

or on: google play

So what did you put in this year? I put in for the basics, Moose, doe, elk. Last year there was a delay in getting results due to the increase in applicants, I assume this is the case again this year.

Check 2015 BC LEH results here: http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/fw/wildlife/hunting/resident/leh.html#Status

Fraser River Sockeye Fishing Tips

Alright, we all know Sockeye salmon fishing on the Fraser is not so much enticing the fish to bite, as it is “flossing” them in the mouth. But, that does not mean there is not any skill involved. I am not claiming to be the best fisherman on the river by any stretch, but here are some tips to ensure you have the best chance of flossing that Sockeye salmon and landing it.

1) Have the proper gear. This means from the rod & reel, right to the hook.

Shimano rod and reel

Shimano rod and reel

You will need a proper salmon rod and reel. The most popular combo on the Fraser river is the approximately 11’ long Shimano Convergance Rod with an Abu Garcia level wind reel. Some guys have the better Shimano Calcutta reel. Grandpa’s trout rod with a coffee grinder reel works, but it is not ideal, and you won’t land Chinooks with that.

Next up is line. I definitely recommend 50-60 pound braided or synthetic line. It does not stretch like monofilament line and it is much tougher. Synthetic line also lasts longer as it doesn’t break down in UV light as mono does. You will really notice a difference in the feel of bouncing betty down river. You will have a direct connection with less lag than when using mono. As soon as the betty stops you will be able to yank on it and free it from the bottom, or set the hook immediately in the fish’s mouth. If you are using mono, the line will stretch first causing lag time from any action to your rod. So you will snag less, therefore lose less gear, set the hook better, and end up catching more fish with synthetic line. Make sure you know how to tie proper fishing knots as that is a bad way to lose fish.

Now you need to get leader savers. This will help the hook drift in a more optimum position down stream, as well as reduce the friction of the bouncing betty from hitting your line. This $1.50 piece of gear will save you a lot of time, line, and heartache. It is worth it. It will keep you from tangling as much, keep you fishing in the river more, and reduce the amount of gear lost. This is where you attach the main line, leader line, and bouncing betty.

The leader line can be 20 pound mono line. I usually get Maxima Ultra green. This will be the inherently weakest link in your setup, but it is ok because it is also cheap. After a while the rocks will chew away and nick this leader line. If you feel multiple burrs you might want to change this up so it does not break when you hook up. If fishing for Chinook, you definitely need to keep this fresh. Sockeye fisherman will want to keep their leaders around the 8-12’ mark. Learn how to snell a hook as it will be a much stronger fishing knot.

Hooks have to be sharp. Your hook is the head of the arrow as they say. Keep it sharp by replacing it or sharpen it on a stone when it gets dull after catching a few fish. Your hook should also be “snelled” onto your line so it is stronger than a conventional knot. Size 2 or 3 should work fine but remember to get barbless for the Fraser river.

Wool and corky can be experimented with at your discretion. I catch fish with or without a corky so I won’t say one way is right or wrong. Basically the idea is that it keeps your hook a float off the bottom slightly. Some guys tie the corky behind the hook so it does not have a chance to interfere with the fish’s mouth. As for the wool, it does not really matter for sockeye but I keep red or orange on just in case a Chinook sees it.

2) Cast correctly.

Okay, so now you have your gear setup right, you cast into the right spot, now what? Well right after you cast, quickly check your reel to see if there is any loops that you can quickly pull out so you don’t get future problems in your reel. Then start reeling in until your line gets to 12 o’clock right in front of you. What this does is prevent any slack from building up as that will make you snag the bottom and get stuck. It also pulls your line straight so the apparatus will drift down the river correctly after passing 12 o’clock. If you do not reel in to straighten your line you will either: a) snag the bottom, or b) your line will not be straight as it drifts into the sweet spot. The sweet spot is after 12 o’clock to about 10 o’clock. Reel back in when your weight stops bouncing or your line is parallel with the river bank.

3) Adjust to the conditions.

If you are not getting any results try adjusting: leader length, bouncing betty weight, corky, wool, or try a different spot. Sometimes you will catch a sockeye on your first cast, I have done it twice this year. Sometimes you will be out there for an hour with no “luck” and a guy will come right beside you and hook into a sockeye. Why does this happen? My theory is different casting habits and different casting distances get into areas that have not been repeatedly casted through, therefore leaving some pockets of un-harassed fish. You step in and cast a bit further than everybody else has been casting, you may hook into a fish. So in saying that, do be afraid to try changing spots, just be courteous of other fisherman out there. If you are casting way further, you may end up drifting too far down river and others will cast onto your line. Also, do not cast too far up stream as you will hook into other fishermen’s lines. Just cast to about 2 o’clock and reel until your line is even with you.

If you notice your bouncing betty weight keeps getting hung up on the bottom of the river and you have to keep yanking on your rod to keep it moving, try lightening your bouncing betty. If you are not contacting the bottom much, you may need a bigger weight. I prefer to have a constant tapping on the river bottom as the apparatus drifts downstream.

4) Land that fish.

Make sure you are ready for the opportunity. Every time your weight stops bouncing it is either a) a fish, or b) a snag. Immediately yank the rod tip up with your thumb on the spool of your reel (so more line does not come out). What this does is either a) free you up from the snag or b) set the hook into the fish. If it is a fish, you will know as your rod tip will be jerking faster and you won’t feel the weight bouncing on the bottom as much. After you yank the rod tip up, be sure to reel in the slack you just created. If it is a fish, they can get off your hook with slack. Slack is the enemy. Keep your rod tip up facing the fish.

Now landing a sockeye is not as difficult as a Chinook, but you need to do some things properly to make it happen. Always keep your rod tip up so you keep the tension on the salmon as well as direct the Sockeye’s head up. With a Sockeye, you can just start reeling and it will come in. Once you reach the shallows you really need to be sure it does not tangle around other boats or other fishermen’s legs. A simple “fish on” will alert those close by to move as you bring it in. Reel as much line as you can in while keeping the rod tip up. If you allow your rod tip to go down the fish will have direct link to your reel allowing it to bounce off the hook by a) creating slack or b) break line because the rod is not doing the work of absorbing force. SO KEEP YOUR TIP UP as you walk back onto shore fast! You want to pull that legal sockeye up onto the rocks good and fast. Most people lose their sockeye on the rocks because they lose the tension in their line and the Sockeye frees itself from the hook, and back into the river it goes. Once you start walking backwards, keep the tip up and head to shore fast until the sockeye is up on dry land.

5) Be Prepared before you go out.

You catch fish by fishing, not by undoing tangles and changing gear on the shore. This means you need to be well practiced in your casting, and again, having the proper gear on in the first place, before going out fishing. If you are new to the level wind style reels, go out to a soccer field and practice casting into a shopping cart with your bouncing betty. Here you can adjust the settings on your reel as well, so you are good to go before going out on the river. Make sure you have enough leader line, corky’s, wool, hooks, leader savers, bouncing betty’s, licence, knife, and bags for transporting your limit of Sockeye home! Sockeye season is for fishing! Make sure all your behind the scenes stuff is taken care of before so you can enjoy catching fish during the season. Then after the season smoke some salmon.IMG_2439.JPG

2014 Fraser River Sockeye Season Journal

Alright, this year is supposed to be a big one so here is how I fared:

Day 1. I got 2 Sockeye salmon in the first 30 minutes of fishing. No the one is not foul hooked. I put the hook into it so I could tie it up while it sat in the river.

Sockeye

2 Sockeye salmon in the Fraser River.

Day 2.I got 2 Sockeye in the first 20 minutes. 1 on the first cast.

2 Sockeye salmon

2 Sockeye salmon

Day 3. Skunked. Commercial fisheries wiped out the river temporarily.

Sunset on the Fraser

Sunset on the Fraser

Day 4. On a time limit, just got a single in an hour.

Day 5. Went out with my father in-law and we got 2 each within 1.5 hours. You have to look closely at the picture to see the 4. One is in the shadow on the right, and the other one is under the other 2 sockeye.

4 sockeye

4 in the cooler

Day 6. Got 5 between 3 of us within a couple hours. On a time limit again.

5 Sockeye

5 Sockeye Salmon.

Day 7. Got 2 Sockeye salmon in 20 minutes.

two Sockeye salmon

Two Sockeye salmon

Day 8. Went out for a Sunday evening trip. River was slow. I got 1 within an hour and a half of fishing.

Whole Sockey BBQ

Whole Sockeye BBQ

Day 9. Two Sockeye salmon within 3 hours of fishing. It was a laborious job.

Sockeye Salmon with filet knife

Sockeye Salmon with filet knife

Day 10-Aug 31. A hard long 4 hours of fishing yielded this single after I lost one on the shore.

Sockeye

     Fraser Sockeye

Day 11, September 2-2014. This was the best day yet. I caught my 2 within 10 minutes. My friend had his limit within the hour.

4 Sockeye salmon.

4 Sockeye salmon.

Day 12, Sept 3. Not as good as the last day but I still got 2 Sockeye in 2 hours of fishing. My bro got 1. I had one break my leader as it was peeling line off my reel.

10 Characters you will Meet Fraser River Sockeye Fishing.

IMG_0627

Sockeye and Chinook salmon

Every year I run into a cast of characters while fishing on the Fraser River. It is more amplified during the cramped quarters of Sockeye season. Correct me if I am wrong or add to the list if I missed one!

1. The Bully. This dude is the one fighting on shore with another fisherman.

2. The Landlord. No matter how many people are fishing, or how few people are on the river, it is already “too many” for one additional person to wade into the river. Whenever you start walking into the river, the landlord will meet you with the obligatory “Hey my buddy is fishing there” or “Hey, I am fishing here.”

3. The Early Bird. It does not matter how early you get to the river, there are always people fishing before you arrive. And yes, they won’t be happy about your arrival as they were in the river first!

IMG_2394

Sunset over the Fraser River

4. There is always one “conductor” or “maestro” per salmon bar. I refer to them as maestro because he is usually trying to conduct all the casts around his vicinity in order to avoid tangles, ironically he is the usually the one tangling everyone! He is the loudest, talks about how it was last year,  and knows where all the “springs”(chinook) are, but can never catch them. Stay out of the way of the maestro!

5. Jerry Springer. You will see a fisherman continually think they have a spring on everytime he hooks into a sockeye.

6. The birdnester. It breaks my heart to see, but there will be one guy out there for the first time with his Abu Garcia reel. He won’t get in your way though, he will be on shore the whole time trying to unspool the loops in his reel. I feel bad for this guy. My advice is to practice in a soccer field before the season starts so you have a good handle on working the reel. Sockeye season is better spent pulling in fish than pulling out birds nest’s.

7. The shortcaster. This guy doesn’t understand why he is always catching other peoples lines. Cast a bit further. You will be alright.

8. The family man. Poor family is sitting on the shore behind fisher dad. Bored out of their skulls,  just waiting to go home.

9. Jesus. This kind man spends his time looking for the elusive Chinook salmon after limiting out on Sockeye. However, the pesky sockeye will not stay off his line so he passes the rod of to other fishermen so they can get their quarry. In essence he multiplies his 2 salmon and feeds the rest of the fishermen on the bar.

10. The Chinook whisperer. This wise man knows where all the spring salmon hide out and has been on the river for every Chinook that has been caught of recent. He knows where the 50 pounders hang out, he just can’t quite get his line out far enough to catch him.

Bonus Submissions:

The Gear Guy. This dude looks like the model on the front of the Canadian Tire  spring  catalogue.  He has got the latest waders, boots, tackle box, fishermans hat, and vest. The only problem is he has a junk rod & reel combo and catches no fish, despite bringing a net.

The Stoner. You will smell this skunk but will not see him.

The good guy. This is the fisherman we all should aspire to be. The good guy welcomes newcomers, gives tips on how to tie knots, and when to cast. The good guy moves out of the way when someone yells “fish on” and helps people untangle their snags.

5 things every man should own under $500.

weatherby rifle

weatherby rifle

5 things every man should own under $500.

A Rifle

A man needs to have the ability to hunt is own game, shoot targets, and in America, protect his land. There are a few good options out there where you can get a tack driver for under $500 and have a gun you can rely on. Weatherby Vanguard series, orSavage Axis series, to name a few. I have used the Weatherby Vanguard for a few years now with no issues and only good things to say. Yes you can spend over $3000 for great rifles but a $500 can get you hunting with decent accuracy.

A Scope

You need a good scope to go with that rifle. Optics are just as important because you can’t shoot what you can’t see. Especially since most opportunities in hunting are presented in low light conditions. I would not opt for anything lower in quality than a Bushnell Elite 3200 series scope or Leupold VX2 quality. If you can find a good Vortex scope or Minox scope around $500 they are worth every penny.

 

A Solid Pair of Boots

Boots are a great investment. If you are on your feet a lot, you might as well be comfortable, and protected. Whether you are working or surviving the elements at your own expensive, you  need to make sure your boots are tough, light, waterproof, and comfortable. Basically make sure you get quality boots. They are not cheap but if you are out in the wilderness with cold wet calloused feet, there is nothing worse. Danner bootsLowa, Meindl, Kenetrek all make good options that you can find that meet this criteria.

bar boots saw

A Pendlay barbell with a Stihl 660 and a pair of Kenetrek boots.

A Chainsaw

Nothing proves your manliness like being able to run a big saw to build a log cabin or bring home firewood to build your house. You can get a midsize Stihl or Husqvarna saw around the $500 mark. You can run a $1500 tab if you want to play with a 660 Stihl.

A Good Barbell

A man needs to stay in shape and build strength. A barbell is the most effective and basic way of doing this besides pushups, pull-ups, and dips. Snatch, Clean & jerks, deadlifts, presses, and squats will make anyone into a respectable man. You will appreciate quality of a good bar from the knurling to the spin of the collars in a decent bar from Pendlay. I have the Pendlay needle bearing weightlifting bar but a bushing bar will suit most peoples needs at a cheaper price. Other bars from Bells of steel and Rogue will get you what you need but I have not personally used them. No Question Eleiko is the best but also the priciest running form $800-$1200.